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Professional Resources

Bullying

Being bullied can cause long term psychological consequences for children and young people. It has significant affects on self esteem and well being. It can get in the way of children and young people reaching their potential academically and socially.

In recent years the understanding of what bullying is and how to manage it has been transformed in settings. The use of bullying policies and increased sensitivity to the needs of victims and perpetrators has made a difference. Despite this bullying still remains a huge issue both in, and outside of settings, and the dawn of social media has added another dimension to the complexity of managing the issue.

Settings should have an anti-bullying policy as a part of the broader behaviour management strategy. Creating an anti-bullying policy collaboratively with young people can be an effective way of the whole setting taking ownership of a zero-tolerance approach.

Dive Deeper

Setting Culture

The values and culture of a setting makes the difference to whether bullying becomes an entrenched and persistent problem. Key messages could include;

    • The child being bullied is not to blame and does not have to ‘ignore it’ or change how they behave – only the bully should make changes.
    • Others in the setting should feel able to speak out if they are worried someone is being bullied.
    • There should be a clear message that young people should not join in to avoid being bullied themselves.
    • Offensive or discriminatory language should always be challenged in a setting
    • Where to find help – this could include professionals, young person ‘anti-bullying ambassadors’ and prominent display of helplines like Childline.

Disclosure

If you discover a child in your setting is being bullied prompt and decisive action can make all the difference to the long term outcome of the person being bullied and the person bullying.

Take time to understand what has happened - and how the child or young person is feeling. 

  • Is the bullying happening both in and out of the setting? Cyberbullying leaves victims with no respite.
  • Do other young people or professionals have more information that would help your understanding of the situation?

It is important that the child feels confident that it is good that people know about the bullying and that the setting will take action to make things better.

    • Ask the child what they think would help them most right now.
    • Make a plan and record your actions in accordance with your policy.
    • Plan when you will next check in’ with the young person.
    • Encourage them to involve their family so they can offer support – then keep the family in the loop.
    • Plan how best to support the bully – seek to understand the roots of their behaviour.

Resources

Bullying UK

Anti-Bullying Alliance

The Anti-Bullying Alliance provides resources as part of their 'All Together' a whole school anti-bullying programme:

Kidscape

Information on bullying for those working with children and here are some of their resources:

  • Kidscape Flyer
  • Log for children to record bullying incidents and school contact record.

E-Learning

'All Our Health' offer free, bite-sized e-learning sessions - to improve the knowledge, confidence and skills of health and care professionals in preventing illness, protecting health and promoting wellbeing. The sessions cover some of the biggest issues in public health including;

  • Childhood obesity 
  • Pollution
  • Alcohol misuse
  • Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)

They contain signposting to trusted sources of helpful evidence, guidance and support to help professionals embed prevention in their everyday practice.

Shelf Help - Reading Well

  • Bullies, Cyberbullies and Frenemies - Michele Elliott.
  • Vicious True Stories by Teens about Bullying - Ed Hope Vanderberg.

 

How Can Norfolk & Waveney Children & Young People's Health Services Help?

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