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Rashes

It is common for babies and children to get rashes which often clear up without treatment. Rashes are sometimes caused by using different washing products as these can irritate your child’s skin. Some rashes can be more worrying and need urgent attention so it is important to know a bit more about these. To see common rashes in children: *Click Here*.

A rash that does not fade when you press a glass against it can be a symptom of a serious illness called meningitis. Meningitis can get worse very quickly, so it's important you know the signs and symptoms and seek help if you are worried: *Click Here*.

If your child seems unwell, has a rash, and has a high temperature (fever) see your GP.

Birthmarks

Birthmarks are not rashes but are coloured marks which are visible on the skin. They are often present from birth or develop soon afterwards.

Some birthmarks, particularly Mongolian Spots, can look like bruises. If your child has a birthmark it is important that it is documented on their health record and included in their red book (Personal Child Health Record). If birthmarks are not documented and a health professional notices a mark which is not obviously a birthmark a strict procedure will need to be followed which may include an assessment in hospital. To find out more about birthmarks *Click Here*.

 

 

Things You Can Do to Help

  • Babies’ skin is very sensitive; there is no need to bath them daily. Instead clean their hands, neck, face and bottom using cotton wool and water only. To find out more *Click Here*.
  • Think about whether you have used any different bubble bath, creams or washing products as these can all irritate your child’s skin and cause rashes. If you have used a new product and noticed a rash, stop using it for a few days to see if the rash clears up.
  • Rashes are sometimes symptoms of childhood illnesses which vaccinations are available for. Children up to the age of 18 who missed their vaccinations are still eligible to receive them free on the NHS, so make sure your child is up to date.
  • Make sure you use moisturising creams and lotions safely as these can irritate the skin and make existing rashes worse if not used properly. For more details about moisturising creams (emollients) *Click Here* .
  • Familiarise yourself with common rashes so you have a better understanding of when you might need to get help. NHS Choices has a great tool to help with identifying rashes in babies to access it *Click Here*.
  • If your child is unwell check them regularly for rashes and seek help if you are worried.

Who Can Help?

You can speak to a pharmacist before trying any new creams or lotions on your child.  To find your local pharmacy *Click Here*

If your child has a high temperature as well as a rash and seems unwell speak to your GP or contact 111 for advice.

You can contact the Healthy Child Programme by calling Just One Number on 0300 300 0123 or texting Parentline on 07520631590. Our opening hours are 8am-6pm Monday-Friday (excluding bank holidays) and 9am-1pm on Saturdays.

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