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Having A Baby

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes only appears during pregnancy. It can happen at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second or third trimester. It usually disappears shortly after giving birth.

It happens when your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels. It can cause your baby to grow larger than normal and can increase the possibility of a C-section or having labour induced.

Having gestational diabetes also means you're at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future.

If you have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes you may be feeling worried or anxious, but it is quite common and with early diagnosis and proper management, it can be easily treated.

Dive Deeper

Reducing the Risk

These tips may help most people with preventing gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Some people will still develop it, no matter how healthy their lifestyle is.

There are things you can do to help reduce the risk;

  • Try and stay a healthy weight before pregnancy. If you are overweight, it doesn’t mean you will develop gestational diabetes, but it does increase the risk.
  • Eating a healthy and balanced diet. Eat lots of vegetables and “natural” foods and try to limit processed foods. Speak to your doctor, midwife or health visitor about the best diet for you.
  • Staying active. It’s important to get lots of exercise while pregnant. If you can, aim for 30 minutes of physical activity per day. You could try walking, bike riding or swimming.

Gestational Diabetes, What Next?

If you have been told you have gestational diabetes you may be feeling a little anxious. Instead of worrying, try and focus on managing it.

Gestational diabetes is treatable and can be managed with some simple lifestyle changes;

  • Making changes to how you eat. Changing food choices and portion size can make a big difference. Try and eat plenty of vegetables and non processed foods.
  • Testing your blood sugar. In addition to your new diet, you’ll also have to monitor your own blood sugar. You’ll be given a glucose meter to check your glucose levels. Your care team will teach you how to use this.
  • You may be given additional medication or insulin to help control your blood sugar levels alongside your change in diet. If you need insulin, you’ll be given an insulin pen with small, thin needles. One to two times per day, you’ll give yourself a dose of insulin.

Try and stay calm and remind yourself that it is treatable. Your health care team is ready to provide support for you and help you make healthy lifestyle choices that could last a lifetime.

Coping With Gestational Diabetes

Some women can feel worried and anxious when they’re pregnant. Finding out you have gestational diabetes might make these feelings worse.

If you’re feeling anxious, talk to your care team and ask for support. This support might come from healthcare professionals, voluntary organisations or other services.

Read more about parental antenatal mood

Who can Help?

If you feel worried and would like more advice you can speak to your midwife, doctor or you can contact the Healthy Child Programme by calling Just One Number on 0300 300 0123 or texting Parentline on 07520 631590. Our opening hours are 8am-6pm Monday-Friday (excluding bank holidays) and 9am-1pm on Saturdays.

You can speak to other Norfolk parents and carers by clicking our online community forum below. 

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